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Jeff Bilmes

Professor
Biosystems, Data Sciences
418 ECE
Campus Box 352500
University of Washington
Seattle, WA 98195
Phone: 206-221-5236
Email: bilmes@ece.uw.edu
External Web Page: melodi.ee.washington.edu/~bilmes/pgs/index.html


Biography

Jeff A. Bilmes joined the University of Washington Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering faculty in the fall of 1999. He received a B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from U.C. Berkeley in 1989, a S.M. degree from MIT in 1993, and a Ph.D. in Computer Science from U.C. Berkeley in 1999. He was also a member of the International Computer Science Institute in Berkeley, CA. He is the author of over 100 journal and conference papers on topics ranging from speech, language, statistical machine learning, human-computer interfaces, bio-informatics, pattern recognition, parallel programming, and high-performance software coding techniques.

Prof. Bilmes is also an adjunct associate professor in the University of Washington Department of Linguistics and in Computer Science and Engineering

His primary interests lie in statistical modeling (particularly graphical modeling approaches), combinatorial optimization, and signal processing for pattern classification, speech recognition, language processing, audio processing, and biological signal processing (bio-informatics). He also has strong interests in speech-based human-computer interfaces (and in fact is the principle investigator in the well-known vocal joystick system for speech based continuous control), the statistical properties of natural objects and natural scenes, information theory and its relation to natural computation by humans and pattern recognition by machines, and computational music processing (such as human timing subtleties). He is also quite interested in high performance computing systems, submodularity in machine learning, computer architecture, and software techniques to reduce power consumption.

Awards and Honors

Recent Publications

  • B. W. Dolhansky, J. A. Bilmes, "Deep Submodular Functions: Definitions and Learning," Proc. NIPS 2016. [ Link ]
  • K. Kirchhoff and J. Bilmes, "Submodularity for Data Selection in Statistical Machine Translation", Proceedings of EMNLP, 2014, pp. 131-141